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Social Sciences

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The senior Social Sciences subjects at Kenmore State High are:

Please click on the subject links above and refer to the Year 10 Subject Guide (PDF, 4MB) or Year 11 & 12 Subject Guide (PDF, 3.3MB) for further information on Social Science subjects and prerequisites.

Contact details for the Head of Department are listed under the "Our School" tab.


Ancient History

FAQs

What is this subject about?  
Ancient History is concerned with studying people, societies and civilisations of the past, from the development of the earliest human communities to the end of the Middle Ages. Students explore the interaction of societies and the impact of individuals and groups on ancient events and ways of life, enriching their appreciation of humanity and the relevance of the ancient past. Ancient History illustrates the development of some of the distinctive features of modern society which shape our identity, such as social organisation, systems of law, governance and religion. Ancient History highlights how the world has changed, as well as the significant legacies that exist into the present. This insight gives context for the interconnectedness of past and present across a diverse range of societies. Ancient History aims to have students think historically and form a historical consciousness. A study of the past is invaluable in providing students with opportunities to explore their fascination with and curiosity about stories of the past and the mysteries of human behaviour. 

Who is this subject best suited to? 
Ancient History is suited to students with inquiring minds who are fascinated by human behaviour.  It is especially suitable for students who wish to build a range of transferable skills that will help them become empathetic and critically literate citizens equipped to embrace a multicultural, pluralistic, inclusive, democratic, compassionate and sustainable future.  The research and writing skills will also be most useful for students wishing to go on to university.  

What are some common career pathways that are associated with this subject? 
Ancient History is a General subject suited to students who are interested in pathways beyond school that lead to tertiary studies, vocational education or work. A course of study in Ancient History can establish a basis for further education and employment in the fields of archaeology, history, education, psychology, sociology, law, business, economics, politics, journalism, the media, health and social sciences, writing, academia and research. The skills developed in Ancient History can be used in students’ everyday lives — including their work — when they need to understand situations, place them in perspective, identify causes and consequences, acknowledge the viewpoints of others, develop personal values, make judgments and reflect on their decisions. 

What assumed knowledge or subject results is recommended from Year 10 to be successful in this subject?  
A satisfactory result in English is a prerequisite.  A satisfactory result in Year 10 Ancient and/or Modern History is desirable. 

What should I be good at to excel at this subject?  
Reading, writing and thinking:  A course of study in Ancient History empowers students with multi-disciplinary skills in analysing textual and visual sources, constructing arguments, challenging assumptions, and thinking both creatively and critically. Ancient History students become knowledge creators, productive and discerning users of technology, and empathetic, open-minded global citizens. 

What specific skills would benefit me in this subject? 
Ancient History enables inquiry-based learning, where students investigate the past by analysing and interpreting archaeological and written evidence. Historical skills form the learning and subject matter provides the context. Learning in context enables the integration of historical concepts and understandings into four units of study: Investigating the Ancient World, Personalities in Their Times, Reconstructing the Ancient World, and People, Power and Authority. Throughout the course of study, students develop increasingly sophisticated skills and understandings of historical issues and problems by interrogating the surviving evidence of ancient sites, societies, individuals and significant historical periods. Students investigate the problematic nature of evidence and pose increasingly complex questions about the past. They use their skills of historical inquiry, analysis and interpretation of sources to formulate reasoned responses. The development of these skills is cumulative, with students showing understanding of different and sometimes conflicting perspectives of the past. 

Are there any compatible subjects that would be beneficial to also study with this subject? 
Modern History is directly compatible with Ancient History, sharing identical syllabus objectives, assessment items and instrument-specific marking guides. Cross curricula priorities and concepts are also examined in Philosophy and Legal Studies.   

How will I be assessed? 

Assessment
Percentage of Grade (%)​
​Summative internal assessment 1 (IA1):  

  • Examination — essay in response to historical sources 
​25%
​Summative internal assessment 2 (IA2):  

  • Investigation - independent source investigation
​25%
Summative internal assessment 3 (IA3):  

  • Investigation — historical essay based on research
​25%
Summative external assessment (EA):  

  • Examination — short responses to historical sources 
​25%


Are there any excursions or any costs for this subject?  
We endeavour to offer a range of experiences on and off campus, including guest speakers, hands on experience with a principal archaeologist, and visits to R D Milns Antiquities Museum to participate in tours and/or workshops. Students studying Humanities subjects are offered first preference in any international study tours offered by the Social Sciences faculty at Kenmore SHS. 

Geography

FAQs

What is the focus area of study for your subject? 
Senior Geography is a diverse subject that focuses on people and the environment and the interaction between the two. Over the two years of study students will be exposed to a number of social and environmental challenges, to which they will be able to analyse data to propose solutions for.  

How does it benefit students?  
It benefits students by helping them gain real world knowledge in areas such as politics, economics and a broad range of environmental processes. It positions students to be able to exit with the skills to help solve real world challenges we are currently facing.  

Who is the subject developed for? 
The subject is developed for students wanting to improve their critical thinking skills, and become a more empathetic person that understands the physical world around them.  

What will the students do in your subject? 
Students will engage in a range of learning experiences that develop their geographical skills and thinking through the exploration of geographical challenges and their effects on people, places and the environment.  

What are they exposed to / what will they investigate? 
Students interpret global concerns and challenges including responding to risk in hazard zones, planning sustainable places, managing land cover transformations and planning for population change. They develop an understanding of the complexities involved in sustainable planning and management practices.  

What occupations/ courses does this subject lead onto?  
Employment in the fields of urban and environmental design, planning and management; biological and environmental science; conservation and land management; emergency response and hazard management; oceanography, surveying, global security, economics, business, law, engineering, architecture, information technology, and science.  

What type of assessment do students engage in?  
There are three types of assessment items in Senior Geography:  
  • Combination Response Examination: a combination of short and extended response items to stimulus material under exam conditions.  
  • Field Report: Students are required to use spatial technologies and ICT to graphically represent primary data and information collected out in the field.  
  • Data Report: Students research a geographical challenge through collecting, representing, analysing a range of data to propose recommendations to the identified challenge.  

How is the assessment structured and weighted in Year 12?  
Students will complete three internal assessments and one external examination during year 12 each worth 25% of the course grade.  

Are there any excursions or any costs for this subject?   
Fieldwork is a mandated requirement for this subject, with a day fieldtrip to Fortitude Valley in Year 11 at a cost $30 and an overnight camp in Year 12 to Numinbah Valley at an approximate cost of $110.

For more information about Geography, please refer to the Year 10 Subject Guide (PDF, 4MB) or Year 11 & 12 Subject Guide (PDF, 3.3MB) or contact the Head of Department.


Legal Studies

FAQs

What will I study in the two year course of Legal Studies? 
Please refer to the Year 10 Subject Guide (PDF, 4MB) or Year 11 & 12 Subject Guide (PDF, 3.3MB) for an outline of the course. You will study a two year course covering 4 Units.

What will the assessment be in Legal Studies? 

​Unit
​Assessment
​Time
​Unit 1: Beyond Reasonable Doubt 
  • ​Examination 
    • Combination response
  • Inquiry Report 
  • ​Year 11 Term 1 
  • Year 11 Term 2
​Unit 2: Balance of Probabilities 
  • ​Argumentative Essay 
  • ​Year 11 Term 3 
Unit 3: Law, Governance and Change 
  • ​Examination
    • Combination response 
  • ​Year 11 Term 4 
​Unit 4: Human Rights in Legal Contexts 
  • ​Inquiry Report 
  • Argumentative Essay 
  • External Examination 
  • ​Year 12 Term 1
  • Year 12 Term 3 
  • Year 12 Term 4 

Do I need to take Year 10 Legal Studies in order to choose Year 11 and 12 Legal Studies? 
It is desirable to have studied Year 10 Legal Studies but not compulsory in order to choose Senior Legal Studies. 

What do I need in Year 10 English to study Legal Studies? 
You require a minimum of a C achievement result in Year 10 English to choose Senior Legal Studies. 

What excursions are offered in Legal Studies? 
Legal Studies students visit the Supreme Court library, view District Court trials and attend the Queensland Police Museum.  

What co-curricular activities can I participate in as a Legal Studies student? 
We offer a range of co-curricular activiites including Moot Court competitions, Rostrum Voice of Youth Speaking competition, Youth Parliament and YMCA Youth Parliament. 

For more information about Legal Studies, please refer to the Year 10 Subject Guide (PDF, 4MB) or Year 11 & 12 Subject Guide (PDF, 3.3MB) or contact the Head of Department.

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Modern History

FAQs

Who is this subject best suited to? 
Modern History is best suited for those who want to empathise with others and make meaningful connections between the past, present and possible futures. Students should be open to the idea that the past is contestable and tentative. Through inquiry into ideas, movements, national experiences and international experiences, students discover how the past consists of various perspectives and interpretations. Especially suitable for students that wish to build a range of transferable skills that will help them become empathetic and critically-literate citizens equipped to embrace a multicultural, pluralistic, inclusive, democratic, compassionate and sustainable future. 

What are some common career pathways that are associated with this subject? 
A course of study in Modern History can establish a basis for further education and employment in the fields of history, education, psychology, sociology, law, business, economics, politics, journalism, the media, writing, academia and strategic analysis 

What assumed knowledge or subject results is recommended from Year 10 to be successful in this subject?  
It is recommended that students have studied Modern History and/or Ancient History in Year 10, and have received a minimum of a C in English.  

What should I be good at to excel at this subject?  
It is recommended that students be relatively comfortable with reading and writing. Modern History is a literacy-heavy subject that engages regularly with a range of written and non-written source materials. Students who are confident in their critical-thinking skills should consider Senior Modern History as it focuses critically analysing and evaluating historical interpretations of events, rather than simply recognising and recalling relevant knowledge. 

What will help me to be successful in this course?  
Engaging with readings, conducting research and actively participating in classroom discussions can deepen students’ understanding of studied historical contexts. Debating the usefulness and reliability of sources is central to Modern History, so developing an open mindset and willingness to hypothesis on the cause of events and developments is essential for students to be successful. 

Are there any compatible subjects that would be beneficial to also study with this subject? 
Ancient History is directly compatible with Modern History, sharing identical syllabus objectives, assessment items and instrument-specific marking guides. 

How will I be assessed? 
Assessment in Unit 1 and 2 will be formative and be closely aligned to the sequence, scope and scale of the summative assessment items in Units 3 and 4. There are four formative assessments in total during Year 11. 

In Units 3 and 4 students complete four summative assessments. The results from each of the assessments are added together to provide a subject score out of 100. Students will also receive an overall subject result (A–E). 

​Assessment
Percentage of Grade (%)​
​Summative internal assessment 1 (IA1):  

  • Examination — essay in response to historical sources 
​25%
​Summative internal assessment 2 (IA2):  

  • Independent source investigation 
​25%
Summative internal assessment 3 (IA3):  

  • Investigation — historical essay based on research
​25%
Summative external assessment (EA):  

  • Examination — short responses to historical sources 
​25%

Are there any excursions or any costs for this subject?  
There are no current excursions scheduled for Senior Modern History. Students studying social science subjects are offered first preference in any international study tours offered by the Social Sciences faculty at Kenmore SHS. 

For more information about Modern History, please refer to the Year 10 Subject Guide (PDF, 4MB) or Year 11 & 12 Subject Guide (PDF, 3.3MB) or contact the Head of Department.


Philosophy and Reason

FAQs

What is this subject about?  
It is concerned with developing the ability to reason, and the role of reason in developing world-views. Students also acquire knowledge of the major philosophies such as Ethics, Philosophy of Mind, Political Philosophy, Rights and Philosophy of Religion. 

Who is this subject best suited to? 
This is a Humanities subject, so anyone interested in people and the world we live in. 

What are some common career pathways that are associated with this subject? 
Law, Journalism, Teaching, Science, IT, any occupation that requires critical reasoning (which is just about everything). 

What assumed knowledge or subject results is recommended from Year 10 to be successful in this subject?  
Year 10 Philosophy is helpful but not required. A minimum ‘C’ result in English in recommended. 

What should I be good at to excel at this subject?  
Being open to new ways of thinking and understanding things from different or new perspectives. Be open to some reading and written communication. 

What will help me to be successful in this course?  
Have an open mind and be prepared to think about things you probably have never thought about before!  

Are there any compatible subjects that would be beneficial to also study with this subject? 
Legal Studies, History, Science, Maths… any subject at all, as Philosophy is applicable to all other disciplines. 

How will I be assessed? 
Mostly take-home assignments, although there a couple of exams, including the external worth 25%. 

Is it a hard subject? 
It is an academic discipline that is huge fun and makes you think until your head hurts (in a good way)!  

For more information about Philosophy and Reason, please refer to the Year 10 Subject Guide (PDF, 4MB) or Year 11 & 12 Subject Guide (PDF, 3.3MB) or contact the Head of Department.


Social and Community Studies (Applied)

FAQs

Is SACS a general or applied subject? 
Applied subject. 

Does it count towards my ATAR? 
Indirectly, yes. A student must study at least 4 general subjects for 2 years. Certificate courses and applied subjects like SACS can be added on top of that. 

What sort of student should do this subject? 
Any student can find value and purpose in this subject. It could be an academically focused student who wants relief from doing six general subjects; they’re interested in their own society, so they’re interested in this subject. We have other students who are more vocationally or career focused who study this subject as well. 

How much assessment is there? 
There is one assessment piece each term i.e. four a year. 

Is there an external exam at the end? 
No, this is a school based subject with an approved assessment program endorsed by the QCAA. 

Are there many big assignments? 
No, but there is one project or investigation per semester. None of these have a writing requirement of more than 800 words. 

What are the exams like? 
Exams tend to be guided activities in class where source material is accessible. 

What sort of activities are done in the classroom? 
While there is some traditional teaching learning to set the scene, most activities are inquiry based. We often work in pairs or small groups to better understand various dimensions of the issues being studied. 

What will this subject do for me? 
It will help you identify and explore issues of concern and interests in contemporary Australia. You will develop skills in how to break down source material and to make meaning for yourself. You will be shown ways of how to investigate and suggest and promote change and improvement in our society. This subject is about active citizenship. 

For more information about Social and Community Studies, please refer to the Year 10 Subject Guide (PDF, 4MB) or Year 11 & 12 Subject Guide (PDF, 3.3MB) or contact the Head of Department.

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Last reviewed 04 August 2020
Last updated 04 August 2020